Thursday, February 25, 2021

We recently launched so if you see any technical glitches please email us at: dtimsina@bhutannewsservice.org

“Umm… My typical day in Bhutan? Interesting question! I am getting older and older and memories have started to fade away gradually. I am glad you wanted to know about my past. Let me first spit the chewing tobacco and recall with a fresh mind. Like many others back in the day, I used to wake up to the crow of roosters everyday – I mean every single day while in Bhutan. My day would start with a few cups of hot tea. Taking care of outdoor chores, in particular, gardening and farming crops was something I would put my efforts into on a daily basis. That’s what my parents wanted me to do too. We had a big family. I did not have other choices. Once energized with a few cups of hot tea in the early morning hours, depending on the season, I would mostly spend my day working in the crop-field. We used to have beans, paakhe rice, buckwheat, mustard, wheat, corn and few other crops. The main source of clean drinking water was about a mile uphill from my house. Walking up and down to get water, that too for a large family, was often a challenge. Yet it was filled with excitement. We were drinking very fresh, healthy and natural water. My mother and I were mostly the ones responsible for getting enough water for the entire family. Once we called off the day, we would eat dinner, take rest for an hour, and sleep early because we knew we had to wake up early the following day. This same pattern was sort of my routine back in the days.”

___
Man Bahadur Darjee, 78 is originally from Chirang, Bhutan and based in Charlotte, North Carolina at the time when this story was compiled.

Story and Photo compilation by TP Mishra for BNS.

More Stories

“I used to have a pretty simple and typical day like most other Bhutanese farmers. I used to drink tea as soon as I got up, and after that I used to head  to the rice field. I used to plough the rice field and make the terraces till lunch time. For lunch, I used to have rice, lentil soup and veggies. Most of the time I used to drink rice beer and wine with lunch.  Then I would take a nap. Usually, I would come home after dusk and have supper and sleep on time. There was no television like these days. The soil was very fertile, yielding a good harvest. Hard work would  pay off. Sometimes I...

“Household chores – that’s what a girl did most of the time. What else? There was no school for us. Only my elder brothers attended school. Every morning we first drank tea. Then, we used to gather fodder for cattle, clean the aagan (front porch of the house), take care of younger siblings, and eat whatever mother used to cook. Back then, a girl could not cook for adults until she was married. So, in Kalimpong, when I was unmarried, I did not cook. Well, I could cook vegetable curry and a couple of other basic items but not rice and daal (legumes soup). My younger siblings were allowed to eat what I cooked. However, my parents, grandparents and...

“मेरो जीवनका ३७ वर्ष मैले भूटानमै बिताएँ । जन्मेर ज्ञान पसेदेखि छोडेका दिनसम्म कति घटना भए होलान्, कति रमाइला दिन आए, कति रुने दिन आए...बयान गरी साध्य होला र ? मलिन आँखाहरु तन्काएर ठूला पार्दै उनले प्रश्नकर्तातर्फ दृष्टिकेन्द्रित गरे । त्यसपछि सनन्न लामो सास तानेर फेरि बोल्न थाले । ...सामान्य रूपमा मेरो जीवन दोरोखा प्राइमेरी स्कूलबाट शुरु भएको मलाई याद छ । पहिले दोरोखा मिडल स्कूल भन्थे...त्यसपछि सरकारी तहमा दोरोखा प्राइमेरी स्कूल बन्यो । म एकली आमाको छोरो, कान्छो परें । एकजना दाजु मभन्दा सातवर्ष जेठो हुनुहुन्छ तर, दाजुले पढ्नै पाउनुभएन । गरिबी र अन्य बाध्यताले गर्दा अरुको हलो जोत्नुपर्ने, अर्काको गोठालो बस्नुपर्ने...विविध कुराहरु झेल्नुपऱ्यो । चैने धेरै कुराहरु त सम्झिँदा खपी सक्नु हुँदैन ! मलाईं चाहिं कान्छो भाइ...

“For most part it was a busy farm work day. During peak plantation seasons, we worked for twelve hours everyday. Looking after cattle, ploughing the fields, weeding the crops, and maintaining proper irrigation are some usual tasks. I also had to preside over rituals according to Nepali Hindu customs, whenever people called me for. Being a priest in the village, I had to skip some of my chores in the farm to perform unavoidable rituals in case of death or birth.  Often, I walked a whole day to go for such a ritual performance when people of Galechhu or Gwong villages in the hinterlands of Gelephu, asked me to do so. Mostly, we grew rice paddies. Besides, dryland crops...